Tag Archives: live music

Cécile McLorin Salvant, Setlist 12/16/17

mclorin_salvant_cecile_1226to1230_crop_767_431_0_0_0_90___5673_crop_767_431_0_0_0_90___13873

It looks like this phenomenal 28-year-old singer Cécile McLorin Salvant was actually my last previous post. Anyway, here’s the skinny on her second set at Scullers on Saturday night, the fourth of the weekend, with pianist Sullivan Fortner, a reprise of their April appearance.

Since that appearance in April, McLorin Salvant has released the double-disc Dreams and Daggers (Mack Avenue). She did a couple of those songs in the set I saw, but here are the basics. From the outset, she said they’d be performing love songs.

“I Didn’t Know What Time It Was” (“The first standard I fell in love with.” Included on Dreams and Daggers.)

“Tell Me Why” (Introduced as a Jo Stafford song)

“Were Thine That Special Face” (From Cole Porter’s Kiss Me, Kate.)

“An Occasional Man” (With no introduction, but appears to be from the musical-comedy film “The Girl Rush,” 1955, directed by Robert Pirosh, with Rosalind Russell, songs by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane, this song sung by Gloria DeHaven as Taffy Tremaine.)

“You Go to My Head”  (Coots/Gillespie, 1938, “the thrill of the thought that you might give a thought to my plea.”)

“Nothing Like You Has Ever Been Seen Before” (By Bob Dorough, “a lot of lyrics.”)

“The Gentleman Is a Dope” (Introduced as “by Richard Rodgers,” no mention of Oscar Hammerstein. From the 1947 musical Allegro. Also was sung by Jo Stafford, but McLorin Salvant didn’t mention that. I guess she’s been listening to Jo.)

“Send in the Clowns” (Which McLorin Salvant said she sang at her sister’s wedding, 12 years ago, as a 16-year-old. “I just thought it was a pretty song.” She cued Fortner by saying, “by Sondheim, you know which one,” and he answered, “It’s the only one I know.”)

“I Get a Kick Out of You” (Which she said she and Fortner had never played together before, although they’d played it separately.)

“The Christmas Song” (Big exaggerated groan from Fortner, because: another song they’d never done before. They kept pushing up the key. Fortner finally appealed to the audience, “You want to hear it high?” Anyway, up to D, with no perceptible strain.)

ENCORE: “You’re Getting To Be a Habit with Me” (Included on Dreams and Daggers.)

-Dec. 17, 2017

Tiger Lillies get tunefully macabre at Oberon

The full review ran in the July 17 Boston Globe.

CAMBRIDGE — We’re all used to post-punk Brechtian cabaret by now (thanks, Amanda Palmer and Dresden Dolls!), but the Tiger Lillies, who played Oberon on Monday night, are another matter. This trio, formed in London in 1989, have been performing their songs and theatrical works over the course of more than 30 albums and in shows at clubs, theaters, and, in one instance, an abandoned prison. They’ve written song cycles based on “Hamlet,” “Woyzeck,” stories by Edward Gorey, and their own macabre tales, replete with pimps, prostitutes, murder, mayhem, and ghosts.

The focus of these events is singer-songwriter Martyn Jacques, who performs, outfitted in bowler derby, his face swathed in grease paint. Singing alternately in a high countertenor or a deep Tom Waits growl, he’s a combination of Mack the Knife and a Pagliacci from hell….

To read more, click here.